Case Management of Childhood Illnesses in the Private Health Sector

Over the past two decades, marked progress has been made in reducing preventable child mortality. However, there is a lack of summarized evidence about what works and what can be done to accelerate the reduction of child mortality. In particular, the private health sector’s role needs further exploration—including which models might be most effective, and which interventions show promise in delivering high quality services and ensuring program sustainability. As a first step in responding to these evidence gaps, the USAID-funded Sustaining Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) Plus project conducted a review of peer-reviewed publications and gray literature to gather evidence of integrated approaches to the management of childhood illness (including diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria) implemented by the private sector. This brief summarizes the findings from the full report available on the SHOPS Plus website. The findings from this report are being utilized to inform a collaborative Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative exercise, which will help to identify research priorities to advance the effective prevention, management, and treatment of childhood illness through private sector approaches or partnerships.

Author

James White, Anna C. Wadsworth, Catherine Clarence, and Margaret McCarten-Gibbs.

Contributor

SHOPS Plus

Published
May 2019
Resource Types
Brief
Technical Area
Public-Private Engagement
Health Area
Child Health
Keywords
child health
diarrhea
malaria
Current Downloads
143

shops-logo.png

usaid-logo-color.png

Sustaining Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) Plus is a five-year cooperative agreement (AID-OAA-A-15-00067) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This website is made possible by the generous support of the American people through USAID. The information provided on this website is not official U.S. government information and does not represent the views or positions of USAID or the U.S. government.